Fuck You Money

by Linus Edwards


I think most of us have the far off dream of somehow obtaining enough money to last us the rest of our lives, without ever having to work for "The Man" again. Some people like to refer to this kind of windfall as "fuck you money." Usually it's the lottery scenario where you win a $100 million Powerball jackpot. That's the easiest scenario to imagine because it literally could happen to anyone - no skill, no work, no talent involved. You simply pluck down $2 at a convenience store and suddenly have more money than 99.9% of people in the world. Other scenarios include writing a best selling novel, forming a business that takes off, or inheriting millions from a long lost rich uncle. These all float through our minds at random points while we wonder if our lives are being wasted sitting at a desk at 2 PM on a Wednesday afternoon on a warm summer day.

I'll freely admit I want this fuck you money. I'd love to never have to work a 40 hour a week job again. I could travel the world, meet interesting people, do things that I could never contemplate doing in my current life. Suddenly my life would gain those 40 hours back and I could use them to expand my mind and live my life to its limits. The money would be freedom to me, not simply a means to obtain gold plated silverware or a garage full of Italian sports cars. Material possessions are of course alluring, but really I crave the freedom to live my life as I would want to live.

Yet, as I write this, I can imagine a starving person in a third world country and how if they ever somehow read this they'd think I was an ungrateful, privileged American. They'd be right too. I already have a good job and make enough money to live comfortably. Yet I want even more? And not just a little more, but millions and millions more. I want enough to never work again. Isn't that just laziness? Am I deluding myself into thinking having this money would change my life, or really do I just want to be a glutton who never has to contribute to society ever again and can live off my money until I die fat and happy?

I don't know, and really I'll never need to know or have to make any decisions in regards to having millions upon millions of dollars. The chances I'd ever have fuck you money are astronomically small, and it really is just a pipe dream. Even if I somehow won the lottery and got the money, would I even look back to this article and contemplate things, or just go wild and forget all about my past self? I think most adjust so quickly to having this kind of money that they literally become different people, removed from their former lives. Usually they don't become happy, but are just faced with an entirely new set of problems to deal with.

In a lot of ways we shouldn't wish this kind of money on ourselves. Yet, it's almost impossible not to always want it, even if it's secretly hidden deep in our psyches. It's always that lingering yearning for something different than what you currently have, the dream in the distance.

I'm reminded of the story of Ronald Wayne. He was one of the original co-founders of Apple, along with Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak back in 1976. However, after a few months he worried about the liability he could have by being associated with the company and sold his 10% share for $800. Yes, you read that right - eight hundred dollars. In the years after he left, Apple skyrocketed and eventually that 10% share would have been worth literally billions of dollars.

Where is Wayne now?

He's living in a mobile home in Nevada, where he sometimes goes to the casino or tinkers with his stamp and coin collection. He claims he is happy and doesn't regret giving up on billions of dollars, but you wonder if secretly the dream of what could have been eats away at him. What would his life had been like? Would he have lived it more fully, explored more of the human existence, not have ended up in the a mobile home in the desert, waiting for his time to come?

That's the gnawing thought that eats away at most of us as we go about our days. We get up early, go to work, come home tired, do chores, watch TV, and sleep. Are we really living, or merely going through the motions? Will we end up that old man in the desert some day, sitting on our porch and regretting the missed opportunities of our younger days? While it's unlikely we could obtain billions (or even millions) of dollars, maybe there is more we could be doing. That's what the question of fuck you money should inspire, what do you really want to be doing with your life?


Numbers

by Linus Edwards


Let's do a thought experiment - imagine if Twitter changed its service so that the number of followers one had was completely hidden from public view. So when you encountered a person on Twitter and looked at their profile, you'd have no idea if they had 5 or 50,000 followers. Would that change how you used Twitter? Would that change how you decided to follow people or what weight you gave to their tweets?

What if we went further and simply got rid of all numbers on Twitter, public or private. No one would know how many followers they themselves had, no one would know if their tweets got favorited or retweeted. People would simply talk to each other and see what they had to say, without having to worry about all the metrics that have become so commonplace on social networks. You'd still have indications of whether you were popular or if people liked things you tweeted, but they'd be more natural and less robotic.

In real life we don't go around with the number of our friends plastered on our forehead. We don't have metrics to figure out how many times the joke we told at a party was then retold to others. We interact more naturally than that, and it has worked for thousands of years. We actually are forced to observe others to determine if we like them, instead of distilling their entire self down to a number. We don't know everything about everyone all the time, and that can be a good thing. The unknown can spur us on to find out more and seek out people we might not have interacted with if we saw they only had eleven followers.

However, I see the counter-argument that these numbers are simply a short-cut, a way to quickly determine social dynamics without having to really understand social dynamics. You can tell immediately if a joke is funny by the number of favs and retweets the joke gets. You don't have to pick up on any social cues anymore, it's simply mathematics. I'm sure this appeals greatly to people that are bad at socializing in real life and like the more simplified set-up that boils things down to clear and obvious data points. It's probably not a coincidence that computer geeks are the ones that created these systems.

But, ultimately I don't think this distillation of socializing down to numbers is a good thing. I do realize I might just be living in the past and have some idealized view of social interactions before the internet. However, I think these numbers are stripping a layer away from our humanity that is important. When we focus more on the numbers and less on the actual people behind the numbers, we lose something. Our interactions become skewed towards getting those numbers, and socializing becomes more a video game with a set goal, rather than simply enjoying people's company.

What's the solution though, can this trend be reversed?

I think if someone did create a new social network similar to my thought experiment, without any stats or metrics, that might help eliminate this phenomena. People would sign up and start interacting with others, not knowing how many followers they had on the service or whether their posts got shared or liked. They’d start to care more about the actual interactions, because that’s all there would be. I'm not sure this network would be successful, but at least it would be something different and pull us ever so slightly back into reality.


The Podcasters: James Smith

by Linus Edwards


This is a continuing series in which I interview great podcasters to learn about their podcasting setups. While the content is always the most important aspect of a podcast, the technical craft in bringing that content to the listeners also deserves attention. I hope this series will illuminate that critical piece of the puzzle.

James Smith is podcast producer and sometimes host, who has a deep knowledge of the technical aspects behind making a quality podcast.

What podcasts do you host?

Currently producing The Verse podcast which is hosted by Justin Gibson with regular crew members James Griffiths and Alec Fraser. I also occasionally appear on the show. We also just recently joined Fiat Lux, the podcasting syndicate headed up by Ben Alexander

The Verse is a weekly podcast where we discuss an episode from the Whedonverse. It pretty much means anything attached to Joss Whedon is fair game. Right now we're working our way chronologically through everything which means were just passing through season 2 of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. We've actually mapped it out and if we keep putting out one episode a week, we'll be going for about 8 years.

Though we haven't put out an episode in like a year, I'd like to ressurect my first podcast, hosted with Griff, called Twobiquity. It was just a show where we could catch up and chat about what we'd done in the last week including TV, movies, music, you name it, we'd cover it.

The final podcast is Unbiquity, which is outtakes from both of those shows. Sometimes the outtakes are better than the actual show.

What's your physical rig? (Computer, Mic, headphones, other accessories.)

So I use my MacBook Pro with retina display for all aspects of the show. It's a beast maxed out with 16GB of RAM and a 768GB SSD. Once a show has been edited, I usually transfer it off to a Drobo FS that's sitting on my network at home.

In terms of recording equipment, I'm using a Samson C01U which was given to me as a gift a couple of years ago. It's a decent mic and does the job. It used to be on a static arm, but I managed to rig it up to an Ikea TERTIAL Work Lamp and use it as a boom. It's noisy if you move it during recording but I generally set it and I'm golden for the episode

I've had my Sony MDR-V6 Headphones for about 6 years now and they're still as good as when I bought them. They're a great set of headphones and are only about $100.

What type of room do you record in?

I just record in the third bedroom in the house which we're using as a study. It's nothing special but there is carpet on the floor which helps to mitigate some of the echo.

What software do you use for recording and editing?

I'm using Logic Pro X to record and edit the show. We use the double-ender technique where each person records their audio locally and then we sync it via Dropbox. If I'm on the show too, I'll record a local sync track using Audio Hijack Pro so that I can match up all the audio files a bit easier when it comes to editing. I know a lot of people like to use Skype Call Recorder but there have been way too many times when people have lost entire podcasts because it was being used as the only recording method.

Shush is also a great little Mac app which lets you assign push-to-talk or push-to-silence to a function key. iZotope RX 3 plugin works amazingly well in Logic and the Dialogue Denoiser is a lifesaver. I'll also use iTunes to convert to Bounced AIFF from Logic to a HE-AAC (tiny file size and no discernible reduction in quality) file for the final upload.

What do you use to host your podcasts online?

Squarespace - who doesn't. Feedpress handles the feed - need to do this if you want to move hosts, etc.

What's your basic workflow for recording a podcast and taking it to the published stage?

It's slightly different depending on whether or not I'm on the call. As said above we use the double-ender recording technique. It's longer to edit because of syncing the files initially, making sure that they don't drift, and uploading, etc. But better quality and doesn't rely upon the Skype Gods as much.

If I'm recording with the gang, I'll also use this nifty Logic workflow to add markers to the episode for easier editing.

Each co-host has a Dropbox folder that's synced with me where they drop their uncompressed AIFFs of the recording. If I'm not on, someone else will also record a sync track.

In order to keep in touch, we've switched from private messaging in App.net and over to Slack for internal comms. Let me just say this, it works brilliantly and if you're not using it, you should be.

Would you like to change anything about your current podcasting setup?

I'm pretty happy with everything at the moment. The only thing that I'd probably upgrade would be my mic. I hear good things about the Rode Podcaster.